Deksmedetomidin And Fentanyl Attenuate The Propofol Injection Pain


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Authors

  • Ayşe MIZRAK Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation
  • Senem KORUK Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation
  • Rauf GÜL Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation
  • Süleyman GANİDAĞLI Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation
  • Şemsettin BOZGEYİK Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation
  • Ünsal ÖNER Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology And Reanimation

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.58600/eurjther.2009-15-3-1361-arch

Keywords:

Intravenous anaesthetics, Propofol, Dexmedetomidine, Complications, Pain, Premedication, Analgesics, Haemodynamic changes

Abstract

We performed this study to compare the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on propofol injection pain. We conducted a prospective, randomized and double blind study of 120 adult unpremedicated patients (18-65 years of age) scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were allocated randomly into three groups (n= 40): fentanyl (F), dexmedetomidine (D), and Control (C). Ten ml of the study solution was injected over 10 seconds. One minute after the administration of fentanyl (1 µg/ kg) or dexmedetomidine (0,15 µg/ kg) or placebo, propofol 2,5 mg/ kg was infused at a rate of 20 ml/ min. Injection pain was assessed using a four - point verbal rating scale. The incidence of propofol- associated injection pain were 65% (26) for group C, 27% (16) for group F, and 25% (10) for group D. The incidence of pain were less in the fentanyl, and especially in the dexmedetomidine groups than control group (p< 0.05). Severe pain in groups were D<F<C (p< 0.05). Heart rate and the mean arterial blood pressure of the groups F and D were lower than control groups at baseline, 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 minutes (p< 0.05). HR of the group D was lower than that group F at baseline period (p< 0.05). In addition, MAP of the group D was lower than that group F at 10, 15, 30 min (p< 0.05). Premedication of subclinical doses of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl effectively reduced propofol-induced pain and its intensity.

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Published

2009-09-01

How to Cite

MIZRAK , A., KORUK , S., GÜL, R., GANİDAĞLI , S., BOZGEYİK , Şemsettin, & ÖNER, Ünsal. (2009). Deksmedetomidin And Fentanyl Attenuate The Propofol Injection Pain. European Journal of Therapeutics, 15(3), 17–22. https://doi.org/10.58600/eurjther.2009-15-3-1361-arch

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Section

Clinical Research